The study of Religious Education is compulsory for each year of study at Avila College. In Year 11, students must study a Religious Education unit for at least one semester. Year 11 students may choose either Religion and Society Unit 1 and/or Texts and Traditions Unit 1, or Religion and Society Units 3 & 4. Year 12 students may choose either school-based Religious Education (3 periods per cycle and not a VCE subject) or Religion and Society Units 3 & 4.

Religion & Society
Unit 1

 


Overview

In this unit students explore the origins of religions and the role of religions in the development of society, identifying the nature and purpose of religion over time for the individual who is searching for meaning, and for society which is shaped by religious structures, beliefs and ethics. They investigate the contribution of religion generally to the development of human society. 

Students examine how religions are shaped by 9 Aspects and how individuals, groups and new ideas have affected and continue to affect religious traditions.

The unit provides an opportunity for students to understand the relationships that exist between individuals, groups, new ideas and religious traditions in the Australian society in which they live.  They will participate in an excursion which visits a range of other faith traditions.

Unit Prerequisites

The study of Religious Education is compulsory for each year of study at Avila College. In Year 11. Students must study a Religious Education unit for the whole year. Year 11 students will undertake Religion and Society Unit 1 for six periods a cycle in Semester One and will participate in a number of Seminars in Semester Two. Students may also choose to undertake Religion & Society Units 3 & 4.

Areas of Study

There are three areas of study:

  1. The nature and purpose of religion
  2. Religion through the ages
  3. Religion in Australia

 

Unit Assessment

A variety of assessment is used in this unit:

  • Research
  • Essay
  • Visual &/or Oral Presentation
  • Media Analysis
  • Examination

View Religious Careers Bullseye

Texts & Traditions
Unit 1

 


Overview

In this unit students examine the place of texts and their literary forms within a religious tradition. Story-telling is one of the major literary forms in religious traditions; other forms include law, prophecy, sacred songs, reflection and instruction. Students explore the importance of texts at the source of a tradition and how their meaning for the earlier and continuing tradition might be found and described. The process of searching for and giving expression to the meaning of text is called exegesis. This unit introduces students to basic methods of exegesis to bring about a deeper awareness of how texts came about, and the meaning of texts to the religious tradition. This unit also explores how texts have been used by people both within and beyond the religious tradition to bring meaning to issues or ideas in a new cultural setting. This unit requires the study of texts in a variety of literary forms.

Unit Prerequisites

The study of Religious Education is compulsory for each year of study at Avila College. In Year 11. Students must study a Religious Education unit for the whole year. Year 11 students will undertake Religion and Society Unit 1 for six periods a cycle in Semester One and will participate in a number of Seminars in Semester Two. Students may also choose to undertake Religion & Society Units 3 & 4.

Areas of Study

There are three areas of study:

  • Exploring literary forms
  • The formation and exegesis of text
  • Later uses and interpretations of sacred texts

Unit Assessment

A variety of assessment is used in this unit:

  • Open Book Test
  • Research
  • Exegesis
  • Presentation
  • Examination

View Religious Careers Bullseye

Religion & Society
Unit 3+4

 


Overview

In this unit students study the purposes of religion generally and then consider the religious beliefs developed by one or more than one religious tradition or denomination in response to the big questions of life. Students study how particular beliefs within one or more than one religious tradition or denomination may be expressed through the other aspects of religion, and explore how this is intended to foster meaning for adherents. Students then consider the interaction between significant life experience and religion.

This unit also focuses on the interaction over time of religious traditions and the societies of which they are a part. For a large part of human history religion has been a truth narrative, offering a means for finding answers to the big questions of life. Religious traditions are in a dynamic process of engagement and negotiation with members individually and collectively, as well as with other key institutions in wider society associated with power, authority and credibility. Religious traditions are living institutions that participate in and contribute to wider societies – both positively and negatively. They stimulate and support society, acting as levers for change themselves and embracing or resisting forces for change within society.

Prerequisites

The study of Religious Education is compulsory for each year of study at Avila College. In Year 12,  students must study a Religious Education unit for Semester 1 as a school-based course.  Alternatively, Year 12 students may choose to undertake Religion and Society Units 3 & 4.

Areas of Study

  • Responding to the search for meaning
  • Expressing Meaning
  • Significant life experience, religious belief and faith
  • Challenge and response
  • Interaction of religion and society

View Religious Careers Bullseye

Yr12 School Based
Religious Education

 


Overview

During their time at Avila students are called to live a Gospel life as demonstrated by Jesus Christ. Students are challenged to reflect on and explore their Christianity, both philosophically and actively, through the classroom program, Reflection Days and community-based projects.

In their last year of formal study students are encouraged to explore their knowledge, understanding and beliefs in a critical manner so that they have a sense of purpose as young Catholic adults.